Home Album Reviews SPILL ALBUM REVIEW: GOOD RIDDANCE – THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS

SPILL ALBUM REVIEW: GOOD RIDDANCE – THOUGHTS AND PRAYERS

by Jonathan Del Pozo
Good Riddance

Good Riddance
Thoughts And Prayers
Fat Wreck Chords

“Now, you’re not naive enough to think we’re living in a democracy, are you, Buddy?”

The sentiment uttered by Gordon Gecko, from the 1987 film Wall Street, could not be more relevant today; it provides a perfect intro into Thoughts and Prayers. In a time of uncertainty south of the border, Good Riddance uses their displeasure toward current events to fuel a poignant punk rock album.

Frontman Russ Rankin sticks to his punk rock roots, themes of distaste and rebellion resonate throughout the album. Catchy melodic punk riffs accompany Rankin’s strong vocal performance to create the Good Riddance sound we know and love.

On the first track, “Edward Pettis Bridge”, Rankin sings out,

Let’s talk about hope/
we need a little sympathy/
I think about my country/
through the lens of history”.

This is a reference to Bloody Sunday, an event that occurred in 1965, when 600 civil rights protesters attempted to cross Edward Pettis Bridge, only to be brutally beaten by police. One can assume that Rankin is relating the discriminatory act of the past, to events taking place today.

The last track on the album, “Requisite Catastrophes”, slows down the tempo in comparison to the rest of the album, but the message stays the same. The song leaves the listener with a message to be aware of the present issues we face as a society. A cue for us to open our eyes to the injustices happening right before us.

Overall, this is a solid punk rock album that sticks to its roots. Good Riddance does not stray too far from the punk rock path and slightly lacks in uniqueness. However, what they lack in originality, they definitely make up for in angst. A solid punk rock album that any fan of rebellion will enjoy.



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